Mahale Mountains

Mahale Mountains National Park lies on the shores of Lake Tanganyika in Kigoma Region, Tanzania. Named after the Mahale Mountains range that is within its borders.

CORONA VIRUS
While the WORLD is having trouble trying to get to grips with COVID-19 and at the same time travel has almost come to a stand still. Take this time to think about the things you would like to do once this has passed.
Safaris remain high on many peoples list of things to do. SO, look up places you would to go to, make an enquiry and enquire now for next year. Who knows, but you might be able to get some good deals now and travel when it is safe again.
Just something to think about.

If you have booked a safari to Africa, please do not cancel it, but postpone it to a later date. Most operators and properties I am sure will happy to do this for you.

As I write this I am in a camp in Shompole in Kenya, thinking what a great place this is to be right now!

Thank you.

The park has several unusual characteristics where it is one of only two protected areas for chimpanzees in the country. The chimpanzee population in Mahale Mountains National Park is the largest known and due to its size and remoteness, the chimpanzees flourish. It also the only place where chimpanzees and lions co-exist. Another unusual feature of the park is that it is one of the very few in Africa that must be experienced by foot.
There are no roads or other infrastructure within the park boundaries, and the only way in and out of the park is via boat on the lake.

The Mahale Mountains were traditionally inhabited by the Batongwe and Holoholo people, with populations in 1987 of 22,000 and 12,500 respectively. When the Mahale Mountains Wildlife Research Centre was established in 1979 these people were expelled from the mountains to make way for the park, which opened in 1985. The people had been highly attuned to the natural environment, living with virtually no impact on the ecology.

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